10 Top Photography Composition Rules

There are no fixed rules in photography, but there are guidelines which can often help you to enhance the impact of your photos.

It may sound clichéd, but the only rule in photography is that there are no rules. However, there are are number of established composition guidelines which can be applied in almost any situation, to enhance the impact of a scene.

These guidelines will help you take more compelling photographs, lending them a natural balance, drawing attention to the important parts of the scene, or leading the viewer’s eye through the image.

Once you are familiar with these composition tips, you’ll be surprised at just how universal most of them are. You’ll spot them everywhere, and you’ll find it easy to see why some photos “work” while others feel like simple snapshots.

Rule of Thirds

Imagine that your image is divided into 9 equal segments by 2 vertical and 2 horizontal lines. The rule of thirds says that you should position the most important elements in your scene along these lines, or at the points where they intersect.

Doing so will add balance and interest to your photo. Some cameras even offer an option to superimpose a rule of thirds grid over the LCD screen, making it even easier to use.

Balancing Elements

Placing your main subject off-centre, as with the rule of thirds, creates a more interesting photo, but it can leave a void in the scene which can make it feel empty. You should balance the “weight” of your subject by including another object of lesser importance to fill the space.

Leading Lines

When we look at a photo our eye is naturally drawn along lines. By thinking about how you place lines in your composition, you can affect the way we view the image, pulling us into the picture, towards the subject, or on a journey “through” the scene. There are many different types of line – straight, diagonal, curvy, zigzag, radial etc – and each can be used to enhance our photo’s composition.

Symmetry and Patterns

We are surrounded by symmetry and patterns, both natural and man-made., They can make for very eye-catching compositions, particularly in situations where they are not expected. Another great way to use them is to break the symmetry or pattern in some way, introducing tension and a focal point to the scene.

Viewpoint

Before photographing your subject, take time to think about where you will shoot it from. Our viewpoint has a massive impact on the composition of our photo, and as a result it can greatly affect the message that the shot conveys. Rather than just shooting from eye level, consider photographing from high above, down at ground level, from the side, from the back, from a long way away, from very close up, and so on.

Background

How many times have you taken what you thought would be a great shot, only to find that the final image lacks impact because the subject blends into a busy background? The human eye is excellent at distinguishing between different elements in a scene, whereas a camera has a tendency to flatten the foreground and background, and this can often ruin an otherwise great photo. Thankfully this problem is usually easy to overcome at the time of shooting – look around for a plain and unobtrusive background and compose your shot so that it doesn’t distract or detract from the subject.

Depth

Because photography is a two-dimensional medium, we have to choose our composition carefully to conveys the sense of depth that was present in the actual scene. You can create depth in a photo by including objects in the foreground, middle ground and background. Another useful composition technique is overlapping, where you deliberately partially obscure one object with another. The human eye naturally recognises these layers and mentally separates them out, creating an image with more depth.

Framing

The world is full of objects which make perfect natural frames, such as trees, archways and holes. By placing these around the edge of the composition you help to isolate the main subject from the outside world. The result is a more focused image which draws your eye naturally to the main point of interest

Cropping

Often a photo will lack impact because the main subject is so small it becomes lost among the clutter of its surroundings. By cropping tight around the subject you eliminate the background “noise”, ensuring the subject gets the viewer’s undivided attention.

Experimentation

With the dawn of the digital age in photography we no longer have to worry about film processing costs or running out of shots. As a result, experimenting with our photos’ composition has become a real possibility; we can fire off tons of shots and delete the unwanted ones later at absolutely no extra cost. Take advantage of this fact and experiment with your composition – you never know whether an idea will work until you try it.

Composition in photography is far from a science, and as a result all of the “rules” above should be taken with a pinch of salt. If they don’t work in your scene, ignore them; if you find a great composition that contradicts them, then go ahead and shoot it anyway. But they can often prove to be spot on, and are worth at least considering whenever you are out and about with your camera.

Texture as a Design Element in Photography

While it’s true that photography is a visual medium, I am always fascinated by images that can suggestively invoke my other senses. Have you ever looked at a photo in a cookbook or magazine and commented that the food looked so good you could practically taste it? What really pulls me into the essence of a photograph, though, is texture. Whether I’m feeling colorful autumn leaves crunching under my feet, the delicate edges of flower petals on my fingertips, or the jagged shards of a broken window– when a photo makes me want to touch it you have me hooked. That’s probably why I’m such a sucker for texture and why I strive to include it as a design element in so much of my photography. I want (or is it need?) these images to speak not only to your eyes, but to as many of your other senses as I possibly can. I want them to speak to your heart.

One of the first things to consider when photographing texture is that the beauty is in the details. While the deserted hallway of an abandoned building can evoke a strong sensory response, it’s filling the frame with a broken window or rusted pipe from the deserted hallway that’s going to really bring your textures to the forefront. That’s not to say that the deserted hallway doesn’t have its own story to tell, but this is not the time for cramming as many elements as you can into the frame. Keep it simple.

One of the first things to consider when photographing texture is that the beauty is in the details. While the deserted hallway of an abandoned building can evoke a strong sensory response, it’s filling the frame with a broken window or rusted pipe from the deserted hallway that’s going to really bring your textures to the forefront. That’s not to say that the deserted hallway doesn’t have its own story to tell, but this is not the time for cramming as many elements as you can into the frame. Keep it simple.As with just about everything we do as photographers, lighting is crucial in accurately and effectively creating a both visual and textural experience for the viewer. The three characteristics of light– color, quality, and direction– are just as defining when highlighting textural elements as they are when photographing people, landscapes, or any other subject. While it is difficult to separate the three, I find that quality and direction of light tend to have the most impact on photographing textures– accentuating them, rather than overpowering them. Generally speaking, soft, cool lighting will enhance softer, smoother textures like ice or water, while hard side-lighting will not only bring out the detail on that rusty pipe or stone statue, but elevate it as a tactile experience. Ambient light almost always works best, providing a more organic, natural feel.

Remember that when you are shooting for texture, your model isn’t going to get bored or tired. Your child is not going to get all fidgety, wondering about the ice cream you promised if they sat still for a nice picture. The only timing issues you have to deal with when shooting texture are your shutter speed and how long your ambient light is going to cooperate. As result, you usually have the luxury of taking your time. Experiment with your composition. Play with your angles. Adjust your camera settings, then adjust them again. Your available light may be your primary tool in these scenarios, but you still have to able to make sure that your camera sees the scene the same way you do. Your digital camera is nothing more than a computer with a window on it. It has no opinions or artistic intent. You have to tell it what you are seeing, so play with your shutter speed and aperture. See where they take you.

Obviously, a certain amount of personal taste and preference come into play, but I tend to use smaller apertures when shooting textures. Shooting wide open and its resulting depth-of-field, can throw parts of your image out of focus– something I want to avoid when photographing texture, simply because textures will no longer look as they should when out of focus. I will, however, use wider apertures if I am including any background elements. Just as with a portrait, an out-of-focus background will place added emphasis on my subject and foreground– emphasis which will significantly enhance the textures in the frame. Try bracketing your exposures until you get the desired results.

I did go with wider apertures because of the background elements. For the cookbook shot, we needed a clearly defined background in order to really emphasize the texture of the ingredients. Blurring out the background behind the butterfly  gave more definition to the textures of the wings and flowers.

Obviously, a certain amount of personal taste and preference come into play, but I tend to use smaller apertures when shooting textures. Shooting wide open and its resulting depth-of-field, can throw parts of your image out of focus– something I want to avoid when photographing texture, simply because textures will no longer look as they should when out of focus. I will, however, use wider apertures if I am including any background elements. Just as with a portrait, an out-of-focus background will place added emphasis on my subject and foreground– emphasis which will significantly enhance the textures in the frame. Try bracketing your exposures until you get the desired results.

I did go with wider apertures because of the background elements. For the cookbook shot, we needed a clearly defined background in order to really emphasize the texture of the ingredients. Blurring out the background behind the butterfly in gave more definition to the textures of the wings and flowers.

For the sunflower, however, notice that there are multiple textures on the same visual plane. Since I was working with a mostly solid, dark background, I wanted to make sure that every element– as well as all three textures– was in focus, which meant going with a smaller aperture.
Texture is such an  interesting and effective design element because it provides visual cues that allow the viewer to put your images into their own context. It gives them something they can relate to. If your photo truly speaks to them, this is one of the reasons why. You’ve given them something that helps make it their own. By capturing the texture, you’ve captured at least part of the essence– and it doesn’t get much cooler than that.

Texture is such an interesting and effective design element because it provides visual cues that allow the viewer to put your images into their own context. It gives them something they can relate to. If your photo truly speaks to them, this is one of the reasons why. You’ve given them something that helps make it their own. By capturing the texture, you’ve captured at least part of the essence– and it doesn’t get much cooler than that.

5 Elements of Composition in Photography

Good Composition is a key element of good photographs yet is something that is hard to define.

Instead of looking at composition as a set of ‘rules’ to follow – I view it as a set of ingredients that can be taken out of the pantry at any point and used to make a great ‘meal’ (photograph). Alternatively I’ve often described it as a set of ‘tools’ that can be taken out of one’s compositional tool belt at any given time in the construction of a great image.

The key is to remember that in the same way as a chef rarely uses all the ingredients at their disposal in any dish – that a photographer rarely uses all of the ingredients of composition in the making of an image.

Today I’d like to look at five of the ingredients (or tools, or elements) of composition that I draw on in my photography. They’re not ‘rules’ – just things that I consider when setting up a shot.

Pattern

There are patterns all around us if we only learn to see them. Emphasizing and highlighting these patterns can lead to striking shots – as can high lighting when patterns are broken.

Symmetry

Depending upon the scene – symmetry can be something to go for – or to avoid completely.

A symmetrical shot with strong composition and a good point of interest can lead to a striking image – but without the strong point of interest it can be a little predictable. I prefer to experiment with both in the one shoot to see which works best.

Texture

Images a two dimensional thing yet with the clever use of ‘texture’ they can come alive and become almost three dimensional.
Texture particularly comes into play when light hits objects at interesting angles.

Depth of Field

The depth of field that you select when taking an image will drastically impact the composition of an image.

It can isolate a subject from its background and foreground (when using a shallow depth of field) or it can put the same subject in context by revealing it’s surrounds with a larger depth of field.

Lines

Lines can be powerful elements in an image.

They have the power to draw the eye to key focal points in a shot and to impact the ‘feel’ of an image greatly.

Diagonal, Horizontal, Vertical and Converging lines all impact images differently and should be spotted while framing a shot and then utilized to strengthen it.

These are just some of the elements of composition that I consider in my photography. They reflect my own style and personality but there are plenty more.

 

Simple Tips To Get The Best From Portrait Photography

Portrait photography generally makes the face, facial features and expressions predominant. It captures the personality of the subject using effective poses, backdrops and lighting to serve different purposes. Portrait photographers focus more on the face and emphasis on it even though the body and the background may also be included in the photo. This type of photography has become very popular that it is what most people choose for their weddings and other important events and celebrations.

Whereas the photography is not that hard to achieve, it may take a few skills to get the most stunning shots. Below are some helpful tips you should consider to get the best from portrait photography for your desired use and purpose.

Tip 1 – Let the camera be at an angle. Shooting portraits goes beyond the usual vertical and horizontal framing. Diagonal angles have a way of injecting some fun into the images and add some energy to them as well. You, however must be careful when angling so you do not end up looking as though you made a mistake holding the camera.

Tip 2 – Add movement to the shots. Portraits are generally static, but they can be quite unique when you manage to introduce some movement. This is something that you can achieve by making the subject move or shooting the subject around moving elements. When adding movement to the portraits remember to use slow shutter speed so you are able to capture the movement.

Tip 3 – Choose wide angle. Wide angle lenses help in creating memorable shots in portrait photography. This is because the wide focal lengths bring about distortions that are wonderful; you can enlarge facial parts or body parts on the frame edge more than the center to create a dramatic effect in the end. You should, however ensure that the subject is at an impressive setting when going with a wide angle to get the best results in the end.

Tip 4 – Allow the face to fill your frame. It is one of the best ways of ensuring that the subject does indeed capture viewer attention. If the subject is the only feature in the shot, then let the face fill the frame so they are as striking as they should be. It may not be the way to go with every one of your shots, but it will work amazingly well every once in a while.

Tip 5 – Play around with unfocused shots. Sharply focused images seem to be the standard for photographers. At times, however, especially in portrait photography, shots that are unfocused tend to work best. This is because they have a tendency of showing real emotion, interest and mood. You can achieve such shots by using a large aperture to create narrow depth of field and then focusing on something that is in front or behind the subject instead of focusing directly on the subject. You can also use wide aperture and focus on something else besides the subject so the full image is out of focus. Unfocused shots tend to be mysterious and dreamy and work for some purposes.

6 Photo Editing Tips You Should Know

In the past, photo editing was not something that photographers were agreed on. However, photo editing is considered as an essential skill for today’s photographers. For instance, with Photoshop, you can perform the post-processing a lot more easily. Nowadays, it’s believed that even the best photos can be improved with a good photo editing app.

Given below are a few good adjustments that you can make in order to make the process more efficient. For instance, you should crop your images first. It’s not a good idea to remove dust or readjust exposure on those areas of the image that will be cropped out.

6 Photo Editing Tips

Crop your Images

Do you have well-composed photos? If so, you can still benefit from a bit of cropping. For this, you should choose the Crop tool and then select the area that you want to keep. This is as easy as it sounds. Once the image is cropped, you should recheck it to make sure you have not removed necessary parts.

Remove the sensor dust

Remember: dust and other particles should be removed from the camera lens before each photo shoot. If you have taken photos without cleaning the lens, you will see dust on the shots. For this, you can choose the Healing Brush from the menu to get rid of the dust spots.

Readjust the levels

If you want to increase the contrast level of a photo, all you have to do is darken the shadows and brighten the highlights. You should go to the Levels and then drag the white arrow in the right direction to achieve the desired effect.

Increase the saturation

To make the colors stand out, you can increase the saturation level. So, it’s a good idea to increase the saturation in order to make your images more colorful. However, it’s a good idea to use this feature sparingly as noisy colors don’t look good at all.

Change it Back to black and white

Mono is awesome in some cases. Therefore, you may want to try out this conversion tool. You can give a go to the preset conversion to change the way colors are converted. Ideally, you should opt for presets that will give you great contrast. Make sure you don’t lose shadows or highlights.

Sharpen up

You can use this feature on the majority of digital photos. As a matter of fact, the settings will be based on whether you want to view the pictures on a computer screen or you want to get them printed. Again, use this feature sparingly in order to avoid digital noise.

Other tips

It’s not a necessity to use all of the features for editing each photo. For instance, in some photos, you won’t need to change the exposure at all. All you have to do is make sure you need a feature to make the image look better.

Once you have completed the photo editing, you should rename the image to save it to another folder. Don’t make the mistake of over-writing the file you took from the camera.

So, these are a few tips that can help you with photo editing.

The Golden Rules of Photography

There has been a sharp rise in the number of people clicking photographs in the last few years. Photography has given a lot of people the freedom to click whatever they like. But, as much as it seems easy and fascinating, there is much more to DSLR photography than meets the eye. There are a few golden rules that you need to keep with you whenever you want to click.

1) Visual Literacy
Now that a lot of people are clicking on a daily basis, it is important to keep in mind that every picture clicked has a purpose and we not only click a frame but something that conveys a message. It is important to keep in mind that an image might influence others in various possible ways.

Visual literacy is about seeking rather than just looking around. When getting ready to click the shot, stop and think for a moment what the picture conveys.

Understanding that every picture has its own vision of the world is important and that when you click something or someone, try to pre-visualise what is being translated from the three dimensional reality in front of you onto the two dimensional space within the photograph frame. Your camera is just a tool which will lend a helping hand to portray your interpretation of the world.

2) Visual Impact and Appeal
Composition, proportion, focus, balance, rhythm and texture are among some of the values in a photograph and all of them affect the visual impact and appeal of a photograph in one way or the other. But, the most important aspect is the value of composition, in other words, the satisfying arrangements of shapes and sizes in the space occupied by them.

3) Composition
Since we are talking about composition, let’s see in detail, why is it important.

Determine your subject and decide the best camera position. Instead of holding your camera at an eye level, try different angles or point of view. Get down lower or higher when composing a shot.

Keep a note of your subject and the surroundings you are in. See if they match perfectly and make sure there are no things such as lamp posts or trees hanging out from the corners of someone’s head and spoiling the frame.

4) Check the Frame
Digital cameras photography is best experienced when you have a perfect frame. Select one by looking through the viewfinder or digital back. Observe the frame from one edge to another. Take note of what might be left out of the frame and can be included to make the frame look better. Work on filling the frame with only necessary elements rather than cropping up the image later.

These DSLR photography tips, if kept in mind while taking the shot, will eventually land you up with something which is perfect and that is the only thing a photographer longs for.

Seven Tips On Landscape Photography

Learn the tricks to improve your landscape pictures from our experts. We give you seven tips to help you take pictures with a breath of fresh air.

1. Light:
Mesmerizing landscape photos are majorly defined by the amount and quality of light they were shot in. If you observe, most photographers prefer to shoot early morning or later afternoons where the light from the sun in low. The low lights add subtle moody hues to the frame and also offer lots of colours to play with. The photographers term these as “Magic Hours”.

2. Composition:
Using the ‘rule of thirds’ is the easy way to understand composition for landscape photography. The principle suggests you divide your frame using imaginary lines to divide into sections. These sections are on the vertical and horizontal axis. Now place your element of interest at the intersecting points. This rule is one of the key tricks used by critically acclaimed photographers.

3. Focal Point:
It is not just portraits; landscapes too need a focal point. A landscape photograph without a focal point usually looks dull and empty. A striking building, silhouette, tree, structure, boulder or rock formations, could all work as focal points. Use the rule of thirds to place the focal point in your frame.

4. Sky:
One of the key elements of a landscape picture, sky, as it makes for the most dominant foreground. The cloud formations or the lines in the sky can add drama to the pictures. In a boring frame, you could also consider enhancing the sky post production or by using polarizing filters. These filters help add colours and contracts to the frame. You could make the skyline shine by placing the horizon lower.

5. Leading lines:
Leading lines by definition leads the eye of those viewing towards the focal points of the shot. Mostly the leading lines are used in the foreground. However, you could use these lines as you please to enhance the picture too. There have been many famous shots comprising only of leading lines that create a pattern. Take your pick but stick to the concept of leading lines.
These lines add depth to the image and also scale the quality of the shot.

6. Capturing movement:
Landscape photography is rarely still photography. The usual mindset believes it to be passive, calm and serene. By capturing the movement of nature, you would be able to create a point of interest with drama and mood. For this, your shutter speed be longer (at times, a few seconds). Now because of this, you would also have to go for a smaller aperture as well as use a filter.

7. Tripod:
Tripods are used to capture images without moving the camera. It is difficult for you to hold a camera all day without moving. When you move, the camera moves too. this is one of the key reasons for images being blurred. It is impossible to hold a camera with wide lenses. Tripods can also be used to increase the height from where the image is being shot.

Things to Keep in Mind When Doing Outdoor Fashion Photography

Outdoor fashion photography is a big hit in the shooting world and the reasons are innumerable. All you need is a good location and your creativity. An outdoor photo shoot means you do not need a personal studio and lights. Although, it might seem easy, the factors that govern your photography in an outdoor setting have a huge impact on the work you do. There are a few things you should be aware of as a photographer to make your photo shoot effective.

While a good looking model and state of the art camera equipment’s are the two mandates, there are a few more points you need to consider.

1. Explore and be familiar with the location
The location that you choose for your shoot will be the first factor that determines the effectiveness of your work. Scout the location a day prior to the shoot and see how exactly can you use it to the fullest. It is even better if you click a few pictures of the places you seem are perfect for clicking.

Following this practice before your next photo shoot will give you the upper hand and you will save a lot of time on the final day. It is good to join photography workshops once in a while to keep up with the happenings in the market and also refine your skill level. Not only this, such tips and tricks are the biggest bonus you will have.

2. Pay attention to the time of your shoot
Once done with the location, it is time to pay heed to the time you want to click the pictures. It is crucial to choose the right time of the day. However, it all depends on your preference of light and how you want your photos to be.

According to a lot of photographers, the best times are just after sunrise or two hours before the sunset. On a cloudy day, the light would be soft and the contrast for the background would be less compared to other days. If you wish to capture photos with diffused light, you can definitely go ahead.

3. Choose the right background
Selecting the right background takes a while. Gauge the place and then visualize your fame. Make sure the colors are in contrast and your subject is not getting camouflaged. Your model should always be in the highlight. With the right photography classes you can learn to understand how your surroundings can make or break the photos you click.

4. Put ambient and flash light to use
Step out of your comfort zone and try a new technique. Use ambient and flash light together to create different and unique effects. Use the sunlight as key light falling on your model and the flash to create a rim light effect.

5. Exposure
Exposure adjustment should always be done beforehand and not after during post processing. Doing so will give your photos sharpness and detail. A photography school is the perfect place to learn and grow yourself technically. Working with things like exposure, aperture handling etc will not be a task once you understand it and there is no one better than photography teachers to do it.

7 Wedding Photography Tips

Learning the art of wedding photography takes some time and practice. Given below are some tips that can help you take photos at a wedding. If followed properly, these tips will help you take your desired shots. This will also help you grow as a professional. Read on.

1. Create a list of places

Make sure the couple knows about the type of shots they want to be taken on the big day. Ideally, you may want to make a list. This is important as far as taking family photos is concerned. Don’t forget to take the shots that you think are the most important to the couple.

2. Find the Location

You may want to check out the place where you are going to shoot the photos before the wedding day. This will give you a pretty good idea of some good positions for photos. These will be the positions where you will get enough light.

3. Preparation is important

Since many things can go wrong on the wedding day, we suggest that you stay prepared. You may have to create a backup plan and get the batteries fully charged. If possible, you may want to be present at the ceremony place. This is the place where you can get important information regarding some good position for the shots.

4. Set expectations

Let them know your style. What you need to do is find out the purpose they want to achieve. Moreover, you may want to find out the number of photos they want you to take. In addition, you should not forget to agree on the photography service charges.

5. Consider the details

You may want to take photos of the shoes, rings, dresses, table settings, flowers and menus, just to name a few. This will give an extra dimension to the album. Moreover, you may want to check out some wedding magazines in order to get inspiration.

6. Use Two Cameras

Having two cameras is important. If you don’t have more than one camera, we suggest that you borrow or hire one. Make sure you have multiple lenses at your disposal. It’s a good idea to use a longer lens and a wider lens. If you have the budget, make sure you buy another camera for better performance.

7. Shoot in RAW

Like most people, you may dislike shooting in RAW since this takes more time. However, keep in mind that on a wedding, shooting in raw can be very useful. Since you may have to shoot in poor light, we suggest that you shoot in raw. While editing, RAW images won’t lose too much details.

So, if you have been struggling as a photographer, we suggest that you follow the tips given in this article, especially if you are going to shoot photographs at an upcoming wedding. Remember: you can’t be a good photographer unless you spend a good deal of time, effort and money into the art. With practice, you will become a skilled photographer. Hope this helps.

5 Tips for Event Photography

As a photographer, you may be called for wedding photography. If you have been looking for some event photography tips, this article can help you. Actually, your job is to shoot some amazing photos. Given below are 5 tips that can help you with your event photography. With these tips, you will be able to take amazing photos.

#1 Dress up

Before you leave for the event venue, make sure you put on the right outfit. People at the event should not feel that you belong somewhere else. In other words, you should be able to mingle with the crowd. And this can happen only if you are well dressed.

You don’t have to put on a suit and tie. You can also do with slacks, a nice shirt and black shoes. The idea is to be well-dressed. Being over-dressed means being on the safe side, but being under-dressed is a big no.

#2 Take Some Pre-event Shots

You may want to capture some shots of the main room before the guests arrive. The event planner will be able to use these shots in order to sell their business services down the road. The pictures will be very valuable for your client and they may hire you again for your services. Therefore, taking some shots before the event starts is a stroke of genius and it will help you grow your business.

#3 Don’t take too many photos

While you may want to take more shots than you need, taking photos unnecessarily is not a good idea. Taking amazing photos is the goal, but make sure you don’t spoil the mood of the guests. The attendees should be able to have a great time and it should be your priority.

The attendees would love to be photographed, but make sure you remember which ones you have had photographed. After all, you don’t want to take photos of the same guests over and over again.

#4 Be Quick

You have to be really quick when taking photos. For instance, while taking photos of candids, make sure you take three frames and then move on. Taking more than three shots may annoy the guests. Moreover, when taking photos during a panel discussion, make sure you takes lots of photos with your DSLR. Although close shots look great, you should make sure that the faces of the guests look clear in the photos.

#5 Edit Carefully and Deliver Fast

While editing, you may have to delete half of the shots. Usually, the shots are good but some shots may be a little better. Moreover, if you have taken three frames for the same pose, you may have to delete two of the frames. In other words, you want just the cream of the crop.

So, if you have been looking for some great tips for event photography, we suggest that you follow the photography tips given in this article. It’s also a good idea to consult a more experienced professional photographer for the same purpose.